Chapter 1. Is Your Glass Full of Water? – Part II

  1. John Kieffer
  1. John T. Brown1 and
  2. Hisashi Kobayashi2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294468.ch1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 58th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 58th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 1

How to Cite

Brown, J. T. and Kobayashi, H. (1998) Is Your Glass Full of Water? – Part II, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 58th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 1 (ed J. Kieffer), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294468.ch1

Author Information

  1. 1

    Corning, Inc., Corning, New York

  2. 2

    Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1998

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375563

Online ISBN: 9780470294468

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • glass problems;
  • oxy-fuel furnaces;
  • combustion air;
  • vapor partial pressure;
  • equilibrium models

Summary

As a continuation of a paper presented at the 56th Annual Conference on Glass Problems, the authors wish to share data generated in the intervening two years. Oxy-fuel furnaces, either converted on the fly or built as oxy-fuel furnaces, have completed first campaigns and are starting second campaigns. Improved construction practices and better materials are improving the expected life and performance of furnaces. Two methods of measuring water in glass will be discussed briefly and examples of ways to translate data from one to the other will be presented. Finally, recent measurements and observations indicate that water in glass may have a larger role in the physical and chemical mechanisms of refining. These recent data help explain improved refining with oxy-fuel.