Chapter 3. Optimization of Oxy-Fuel Combustion with Optical Sensors

  1. John Kieffer
  1. W. Von Drasek1,
  2. E. Duchateau1,
  3. L. Philippe1 and
  4. R. Grosman2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294468.ch3

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 58th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 58th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 1

How to Cite

Von Drasek, W., Duchateau, E., Philippe, L. and Grosman, R. (1998) Optimization of Oxy-Fuel Combustion with Optical Sensors, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 58th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 1 (ed J. Kieffer), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294468.ch3

Author Information

  1. 1

    American Air Liquide, Countryside, Illinois

  2. 2

    Air Liquide America Corporation, Countryside, Illinois

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1998

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375563

Online ISBN: 9780470294468

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Keywords:

  • optimization;
  • optical sensors;
  • oxy-fuel combustion technology;
  • optimize furnace operation;
  • qxy-fuel burners

Summary

As the glass industry continues to widely adopt oxy-fuel combustion technology, it is critical that it be implemented in the most efficient way so as to optimize furnace operation, improve efficiency, and reduce production costs. To achieve better optimization of the combustion process, improved and alternative methods for monitoring and controlling combustion parameters are required. Here we present a novel method for monitoring and controlling oxy-fuel burners by strategic placement of optical sensors. The sensors are integrated into an industrial oxy-fuel burner capable of withstanding harsh environments. Radiation from the flame at selected wavelengths that cover the OH, CH, and C2 bands are collected from the burner and transported to a PC-based spectrometer by fiber optics. Using neural network models, the signals from these species provide real-time measure of stoichiometry and power. The processed information can then be used in a control loop for adjusting and optimizing combustion parameters. This novel technology has been successfully demonstrated in a 200 t/day oxy-fired container glass melter. Results presented show that both stoichiometry and power changes of a given oxy-fuel burner can be reliably detected by using the optical sensor placed in a strategic location in a commercial glass furnace.