Chapter 5. Investigation of Liquid Contact Refractory Corrosion Under Oxy-Fuel Glass Melting Atmospheres

  1. John Kieffer
  1. S. M. Winder,
  2. A. Gupta and
  3. K. R. Selkregg

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294468.ch5

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 58th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 58th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 1

How to Cite

Winder, S. M., Gupta, A. and Selkregg, K. R. (1998) Investigation of Liquid Contact Refractory Corrosion Under Oxy-Fuel Glass Melting Atmospheres, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 58th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 1 (ed J. Kieffer), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294468.ch5

Author Information

  1. Monofrax Inc., Falconer, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1998

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375563

Online ISBN: 9780470294468

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • liquid contact refractory corrosion;
  • oxy-fuel glass melting;
  • air-fuel-fired furnaces;
  • volatile hydroxide vapor species;
  • superstructure refractories

Summary

Oxy-fuel-fired glass-melting furnace atmospheres contain approximately 3.5 times more water vapor than air-fuel-fired furnaces, which increases the concentration of hydroxyl ions (OH-) dissolved in the glass melt. The effects on glass properties due to this chemical change are well understood, including reductions in viscosity and transformation temperature (Tg), and increased tendency toward phase separation and crystallization. Recent papers have explained the reaction of this additional water with the molten glass surface to produce increased amounts of volatile hydroxide vapor species, which cause exacerbated corrosion of superstructure refractories. However, the corrosion of superstructure refractories contaminated with silicate liquids generated from atmospherically borne batch dust remains inadequately investigated. In addition, the corrosion rate of oxy-fuel glass tank melt contact refractories is frequently speculated upon relative to air-fuel, but is poorly documented or understood. Fusion-cost alumina refractories (Monofrax M and H) were exposed to naturally deposited batch dust in industrial oxy-fuel melter superstructures. Glass contact corrosion of fusion-cast alumina-zirconia-silicate (AZS) and fused zirconia refractories were compared under laboratory oxy-fuel and air-fuel environments for a range of industrial glass compositions. Samples exposed to different test conditions were examined using reflected light optical microscopy and SEM/EDS to ascertain the corrosion mechanisms and relative rates. In addition to presenting results from corrosion studies, this paper focuses on the implications of the test results on refractory selection criteria for oxy-fuel-fired furnaces.