Chapter 10. Formation of Carbon Coatings on SiC Fibers by Selective Etching in Halogens and Supercritical Water

  1. Don Bray
  1. Y. G. Gogotsi1,
  2. S. Welz1,
  3. J. Daghfal1,
  4. M. J. Mcnallan2,
  5. I.-D. Jeon2,
  6. K. G. Nickel3 and
  7. T. Kraft3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294482.ch10

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3

How to Cite

Gogotsi, Y. G., Welz, S., Daghfal, J., Mcnallan, M. J., Jeon, I.-D., Nickel, K. G. and Kraft, T. (1988) Formation of Carbon Coatings on SiC Fibers by Selective Etching in Halogens and Supercritical Water, in 22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3 (ed D. Bray), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294482.ch10

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 842 W. Taylor St., Chicago, IL 60607, USA

  2. 2

    UIC, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering

  3. 3

    Institut für Mineralogie, Petrologie und Geochemie, Universität Tübingen, Wilhelmstr. 56, D-72074 Tübingen, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375587

Online ISBN: 9780470294482

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Keywords:

  • filaments;
  • hydrothermal;
  • chlorine;
  • ceramics;
  • catastrophic

Summary

Carbon coatings can be obtained on silicon carbide fibers by selective etching that removes silicon from the surface layer of the fiber. A gas or fluid (chlorine, supercritical water, etc.) can be used. This approach allows us to solve the problems of uniformity and adherence of coatings, as well as avoid bridging of filaments. The principal difference between the suggested method and other approaches is that the coating is not deposited on the surface of the carbide; rather the carbide surface is converted into carbon. This method can provide a simple and inexpensive route to carbon coatings (thickness from 10 nm to several microns) for a wide range of applications. It is shown that hydrothermal leaching produces a smooth and uniform carbon film on the surface of polymer-derived SiC fibers, however treatment of CVD fibers requires more efforts. Similar carbon coatings have been obtained by halogenation of SiC fibers in chlorine-containing environments.