Chapter 16. Submicrometer Al2O3/Ti(C, O, N) Composites for Tool Applications

  1. Don Bray
  1. Andreas Krell,
  2. Lutz-Michael Berger and
  3. Paul Blank

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294482.ch16

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3

How to Cite

Krell, A., Berger, L.-M. and Blank, P. (1988) Submicrometer Al2O3/Ti(C, O, N) Composites for Tool Applications, in 22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3 (ed D. Bray), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294482.ch16

Author Information

  1. Fraunhofer-Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Sintered Materials, D-01277 Dresden, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375587

Online ISBN: 9780470294482

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Keywords:

  • alumina;
  • oxygen;
  • oxycarbonitride;
  • carbothemal;
  • substoichiometric

Summary

Co-milling of commercial TiC with increasingly fine-grained alumina powders resulted in grain sizes of 0.9 μm in the sintered microstructure with a hardness HV10 = 22.4 GPa if an alumina powder < 0.2 μm was used. The grindability of cubic phases on the basis of TiC was greatly improved by the incorporation of oxygen into the lattice, and microstructures with grain sizes close to 0.5 μm were obtained. Oxycarbonitride increased the strength to 925 MPa. A maximum hardness HV10 = 22.8 GPa was observed for a composition with substoichiometric TiC0.73O0.14. Most fine-grained composite powders were prepared by carbothermal reduction of Al2TiO5, but the pressed samples could not be sintered below 1750 °C, and the grain sizes in these microstructures were never smaller than 1 μm.