Chapter 3. Techniques for Measuring Interfacial Recession in CFCC's and the Implications on Subcritical Crack Growth

  1. Don Bray
  1. C. A. Lewinsohn1,
  2. J. I. Eldridge2 and
  3. R. H. Jones1

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294482.ch3

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3

How to Cite

Lewinsohn, C. A., Eldridge, J. I. and Jones, R. H. (1988) Techniques for Measuring Interfacial Recession in CFCC's and the Implications on Subcritical Crack Growth, in 22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3 (ed D. Bray), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294482.ch3

Author Information

  1. 1

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352

  2. 2

    NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375587

Online ISBN: 9780470294482

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Keywords:

  • ceramic;
  • propagation;
  • micrographs;
  • compliance;
  • microscopy

Summary

Interfacial properties play a significant role in determining the mechanical response of continuous fiber reinforced, ceramic composites. Increases in fracture toughness, relative to the monolithic matrix material, and non-catas trophic failure modes are dependent on fiber matrix debonding during crack propagation. The most common method employed to promote debonding at the fiber matrix interface is to incorporate an interphase material. Unfortunately, most interphase materials are susceptible to degradation when exposed to oxidizing environments. Degradation of the interphase also degrades the composite properties and may influence the failure mode. In many cases, oxidation may result in the loss of interphase material. Development of composites with degradation-resistant interphases requires a technique to measure the extent of interphase recession. This paper will demonstrate the use of a fiber push-in technique to determine interphase recession distances for carbon interphases and will compare the relative advantages of this method with optical measurements and TGA.