Chapter 57. Grain Boundaries, Oxidation, and Strength of Heat Treated SiC

  1. Don Bray
  1. M. E. Sixta,
  2. W. J. Moberly Chan and
  3. L. C. De Jonghe

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294482.ch57

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3

How to Cite

Sixta, M. E., Chan, W. J. M. and De Jonghe, L. C. (1988) Grain Boundaries, Oxidation, and Strength of Heat Treated SiC, in 22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3 (ed D. Bray), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294482.ch57

Author Information

  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Department of Materials Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375587

Online ISBN: 9780470294482

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Keywords:

  • thermomechanical;
  • microstructure;
  • chemistry;
  • degradation;
  • environments.

Summary

After thermomechanical processing to develop a tough ceramic microstructure, additional thermal processing often is desirable to alter surface conditions such as for joining applications and/or for improving corrosion resistance. These subsequent heat treatments can change the near-surface fracture path of the SiC from a tough intergranular mode to a transgranular mode. However, the bulk strength degradation can be minimized while improving the oxidation resistance by a factor of 4. The role of the grain boundaries is investigated with SEM, HR-TEM, and EDS. Subtle changes in the grain boundary chemistry and structure dramatically influence strength and oxidation.