Chapter 67. Some Limitations in the Elevated-Temperature, Constant Stress-Rate Flexural Testing for Advanced Ceramics with Reference to the New, Ambient-Temperature Test Standard Astm C 1368

  1. Don Bray
  1. Sung R. Choi1 and
  2. John P. Gyekenyesi2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294482.ch67

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3

How to Cite

Choi, S. R. and Gyekenyesi, J. P. (1988) Some Limitations in the Elevated-Temperature, Constant Stress-Rate Flexural Testing for Advanced Ceramics with Reference to the New, Ambient-Temperature Test Standard Astm C 1368, in 22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 3 (ed D. Bray), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294482.ch67

Author Information

  1. 1

    Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115

  2. 2

    NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1988

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375587

Online ISBN: 9780470294482

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Keywords:

  • alumina;
  • nitride;
  • parameters;
  • mechanism;
  • logarithmic

Summary

The room-temperature, constant stress-rate (“dynamic fatigue”) flexural testing was performed in distilled water for 96 wt % alumina in accordance with new ASTM C 1368. The slow crack growth parameters were reasonably consistent (and reproducible), independent of the range and number of stress rates chosen. Despite some creep strains, the results of elevated-temperature, constant stress-rate testing for NC132 silicon nitride at 1100°C and 96 wt % alumina at 1000°C showed that one governing failure mechanism, slow crack growth, was associated with the material, with reasonably consistent slow crack growth parameters for the chosen range of applied stress rates. Limitations regarding the material deterioration and the crack healing or blunting due to enhanced creep deformation were also discussed in conjunction with their effects on the estimation of slow crack growth parameters.