Chapter 3. High Temperature Oxidation and Corrosion of a Porous Si2N2O-ZrO2 Composite Material

  1. Don Bray
  1. Maiken Heim1,4,
  2. Jiaxin Chen1,
  3. Colette O'Meara2,
  4. Refael Gatt2 and
  5. Robert Pompe3

Published Online: 23 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294499.ch3

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4

How to Cite

Heim, M., Chen, J., O'Meara, C., Gatt, R. and Pompe, R. (1998) High Temperature Oxidation and Corrosion of a Porous Si2N2O-ZrO2 Composite Material, in 22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4 (ed D. Bray), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294499.ch3

Author Information

  1. 1

    Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry, Göteborg University and Chalmers University of Technology, 412 96 Göteborg, Sweden

  2. 2

    Physics Dept., Chalmers University of Technology, 412 96 Göteborg, Sweden

  3. 3

    Swedish Ceramic Institute, Box 5403, 402 29 Göteborg, Sweden

  4. 4

    Rutgers University, Ceramic and Materials Engineering, 607 Taylor Rd., Piscataway, NJ 08854–8065, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 MAR 2010
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1998

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375594

Online ISBN: 9780470294499

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Keywords:

  • remodeling;
  • consideration;
  • laminated;
  • balustrades;
  • insulating

Summary

The paper presents results concerning the high temperature oxidation and corrosion of a porous Si2N2O-ZrO2 ceramic composite material. It was found that for oxidation at temperatures up to 1100°C only Si2N2O is involved in the reaction, silica is formed and the weight gain obeys a parabolic law. At temperatures >1100°C divergence from pure parabolic regime increases with increasing temperature. At these temperatures SiO2 and ZrO2 start to form a protective zirconium containing silicate layer which inhibits the parabolic oxidation of Si2N2O. The formation of amorphous silica on Si2N2O was found to be faster than on Si. Pre-oxidation treatment at high temperatures significantly improves the oxidation resistance at lower temperatures. Water vapor was found to be a more aggressive oxidizing species than O2 and can significantly enhance oxidation. Wet oxidation with or without salt has been found to enhance oxidation and corrosion at temperatures of ∼1250°C. This effect is less profound at higher temperatures. The lowest weight gains have been observed at temperatures >1300°C which might be caused by the protecting effect of the formed zirconium silicate and cristobalite phases, their formation being promoted by the presence of water and salt vapor. At 1000°C oxidation always occurs at all surfaces, while at ∼1200°C, pore closure may or may not occur depending on the gaseous environment.