Chapter 39. Irradiation Creep of Advanced Sic-Based Fibers

  1. Don Bray
  1. G. E. Youngblood1,
  2. R. H. Jones1,
  3. G. N. Morscher2,
  4. R. Scholz3 and
  5. A. Kohyama4

Published Online: 23 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294499.ch39

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4

How to Cite

Youngblood, G. E., Jones, R. H., Morscher, G. N., Scholz, R. and Kohyama, A. (2010) Irradiation Creep of Advanced Sic-Based Fibers, in 22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4 (ed D. Bray), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294499.ch39

Author Information

  1. 1

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352

  2. 2

    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH 45106

  3. 3

    Commission of the European Community, JRC Ispra, 21020 Ispra (VA), Italy

  4. 4

    Kyoto University, Kyoto 611, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 MAR 2010
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1998

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375594

Online ISBN: 9780470294499

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Keywords:

  • contamination;
  • curbside program;
  • variation;
  • assumptions;
  • flexibility

Summary

Continuous fiber-reinforced SiCf/SiC composites have low residual radioactivity and promising high temperature mechanical properties which make them attractive for applications in advanced fusion energy systems. For potential composite applications in the 600–1000°C fusion relevant temperature range, a temperature range where thermal creep generally is insignificant in SiC or in advanced SiC fibers, irradiation-enhanced creep (IEC) may be important. In situ IEC tests were conducted in torsion on SCS-6 SiC fiber irradiated with 14 MeV deuterons to relatively low doses (0.06 dpa) at 450, 600 and 800°C. The steady-state torsional creep rate depended linearly on stress and particle flux and surprisingly increased as the irradiation temperature decreased. A bend stress relaxation (BSR) fiber creep test has been adopted to further examine IEC during neutron irradiation in a reactor to high doses (<10 dpa). Reference 1 and 100 hr. thermal BSR creep test results were obtained for selected fibers (Sylramic, Hi Nicalon S, Hi Nicalon, Nicalon CG and Tyranno E) and are compared to irradiation dimensional stability tests for these fibers.