Chapter 4. Low Damage, High Productivity Abrasive Grinding of Ceramics

  1. Don Bray
  1. Robert Sabia1,
  2. Victor A. Greenhut1,
  3. Dale E. Niesz1,
  4. Ping Tang2,
  5. Ruilin Zeng2 and
  6. Ioan Marinescu2

Published Online: 23 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294499.ch4

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4

How to Cite

Sabia, R., Greenhut, V. A., Niesz, D. E., Tang, P., Zeng, R. and Marinescu, I. (1998) Low Damage, High Productivity Abrasive Grinding of Ceramics, in 22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4 (ed D. Bray), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294499.ch4

Author Information

  1. 1

    Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey Department of Ceramic and Materials Engineering, Piscataway, NJ 08855

  2. 2

    Kansas State University Department of Industrial and Manufacturing System Engineering

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 MAR 2010
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1998

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375594

Online ISBN: 9780470294499

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Keywords:

  • ingredients;
  • insulating;
  • polymers;
  • fabrication;
  • consumption

Summary

The development of grinding techniques which result in both low damage and high productivity is critical to the ceramic industry. The objective of this research is to identify machining conditions which maximize strength and surface finish quality as well as minimize damage for ceramic materials. This report presents results for grinding experiments performed on pre-heated silicon nitride and for micrognnding (lapping) experiments performed on aluminum nitride. Silicon nitride samples were ground at temperatures of 30, 600, and 800°C and analyzed for gnnding forces and surface roughness in order to determine the conditions most likely to exhibit ductile mode gnnding behavior. Further gnnding was then performed on multiple Si3N4 samples at the determined conditions for statistical verification of strength results. Multiple aluminum nitride samples were lapped under variable conditions and tested for material removal rates and strength to determine optimal lapping conditions. Analysis of ground and polished samples included surface roughness, material removal, and fracture strength measurements, as well as post-failure fracture analysis using optical and electron microscopy.