Chapter 6. Wear Performance of Monolithic and Composite Mixing Tubes for Abrasive Water Jet Cutting of Ceramics

  1. Don Bray
  1. M. Ramulu1,
  2. M. G. Jenkins1,
  3. T. L. Stevens2 and
  4. J. A. Salem3

Published Online: 23 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294499.ch6

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4

22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4

How to Cite

Ramulu, M., Jenkins, M. G., Stevens, T. L. and Salem, J. A. (1998) Wear Performance of Monolithic and Composite Mixing Tubes for Abrasive Water Jet Cutting of Ceramics, in 22nd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 19, Issue 4 (ed D. Bray), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294499.ch6

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195–2600

  2. 2

    Hewlett-Packard Company Corvalis, OR 97330–4239

  3. 3

    NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH 48135–3191

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 MAR 2010
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1998

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375594

Online ISBN: 9780470294499

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Keywords:

  • efficiency;
  • formulations;
  • characteristics;
  • horizon;
  • glass-ceramic

Summary

Abrasive water jet (AWJ) cutting is one of the more versatile and useful technological processes for machining intricate and complex shapes from various ceramics, and in particular ceramic composites. However, a critical component of AWJ systems is the mixing tube where the high-velocity jet of water is mixed with the cutting abrasive (e.g, garnet). Choice of the mixing tube material (typically a tungsten carbide) has a direct effect on the AWJ cutting performance and the economics of the fabrication process. In this study, the wear mechanisms in AWJ mixing tubes were identified through electron microscopy and surface profilometry. Pertinent mechanical properties were targeted through the application of theoretical wear models. Finally, AWJ mixing tubes made of various alternative materials for high performance were tested in the AWJ cutting environment to verify both the identified wear mechanisms and the choice of the alternative materials.