Chapter 17. A High-Efficiency, Low-NOx Burner for Oxy-Gas Glass Furnaces

  1. Charles H. Drummond III
  1. David Rue1,
  2. Hamid Abbasi1,
  3. David Neff2 and
  4. Patrick Mohr2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294536.ch17

59th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 1

59th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 1

How to Cite

Rue, D., Abbasi, H., Neff, D. and Mohr, P. (1999) A High-Efficiency, Low-NOx Burner for Oxy-Gas Glass Furnaces, in 59th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 1 (ed C. H. Drummond), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294536.ch17

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Gas Technology

  2. 2

    Combustion Tec, Inc.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1999

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375617

Online ISBN: 9780470294536

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Keywords:

  • oxy-gas glass furnaces;
  • energy savings;
  • burning soot;
  • commercial demonstration;
  • temperature profiles

Summary

Switching from air-gas to oxy-gas combustion in glass furnaces offers the advantages of reduced energy costs, lower NOx and particulate emissions, and decreased capital and maintenance costs by eliminating flue gas cleaning and heat recovery regenerators. Oxy-gas flames burn at higher temperatures, providing energy savings through more efficient radiant heat transfer and higher energy availability. Low N0X levels result from the reduced amount of nitrogen in the flame. At high oxy-gas flame temperatures, the combustion products are not luminous (low emissivity), which limits process efficiency and production rate and results in higher-than-necessary fuel and oxygen consumption. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Combustion Tec, Inc., (CTI) have completed laboratory testing of 0.5 MMBtu/h versions of a high-luminosity, low-NOx oxy-gas burner and are preparing a 3 MMBtu/h version for testing. This IGT-patented burner produces a highly luminous flame by forming and then burning soot in the flame. Tests show an increase in heat transfer to the load of more than 12%, a significant decrease in NOx emissions compared with other oxy-gas burners, a flame shape with larger coverage of the load, and a reduction in exhaust gas temperatures by more than 100°F compared with commercial low-NOx oxy-gas burners. Even greater increases in heat transfer and reductions in NOx are expected in the first commercial demonstration next year.