Chapter 4. High-Temperature IR Radiation Conductivity of Industrial Glasses

  1. Charles H. Drummond III
  1. Peter A. Van Nijnatten,
  2. J. T. Broekhuijse and
  3. A. J. Faber

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294536.ch4

59th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 1

59th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 1

How to Cite

Van Nijnatten, P. A., Broekhuijse, J. T. and Faber, A. J. (1999) High-Temperature IR Radiation Conductivity of Industrial Glasses, in 59th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 1 (ed C. H. Drummond), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294536.ch4

Author Information

  1. TNO Institute of Applied Physics, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1999

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375617

Online ISBN: 9780470294536

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Keywords:

  • industrial glasses;
  • irradiation;
  • spectral emissivities;
  • radiative properties;
  • spectral absorption

Summary

Radiation is the dominant mode of heat transfer at melting and forming temperatures of glass. The radiative properties of industrial glasses depend on temperature, glass composition, type and content of coloring ions, water content, and redox state. Because there is an obvious lack of reliable data on these radiative properties, a unique high-temperature optical test facility was built for the determination of spectral absorption in the wavelength range of 0.7–9 m̈m of glass at temperatures up to 1450°C. Many of the systematic errors occurring in existing measurement methods are eliminated by the special features of this facility, which include control of the atmosphere above the melt and the redox state of the glass. The paper discusses the principle of operation based on the measurement of spectral emissivity or the ratio of spectral emissivities, the different measurement procedures, and the preliminary results obtained on clear float glass at 800, 1000, and 1200°C.