Chapter 12. A Critical Evaluation of Dispersants: Part II. Effects on Rheology, pH, and Specific Adsorption

  1. William M. Carty
  1. Katherine R. Rossington,
  2. Udayan Senapati and
  3. William M. Carty

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294543.ch12

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 2

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 2

How to Cite

Rossington, K. R., Senapati, U. and Carty, W. M. (1999) A Critical Evaluation of Dispersants: Part II. Effects on Rheology, pH, and Specific Adsorption, in Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 2 (ed W. M. Carty), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294543.ch12

Author Information

  1. New York State Center for Advanced Ceramic Technology, Whiteware Research Center, New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1999

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375624

Online ISBN: 9780470294543

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Keywords:

  • efficient;
  • rheological;
  • viscosity;
  • suspensions;
  • dispersant

Summary

Six dispersants commonly used in the whiteware industry were evaluated in a typical whiteware body composition suspension and a clay suspension. The dispersants evaluated included the sodium salts of polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, silicate, carbonate, phosphate, and 1:1 (carbonate:silicate). The 1:1 dispersant was also evaluated as a function of the addition sequence of carbonate and silicate. Apparent viscosity and pH were measured for all dispersants, and zeta potential measurements were taken on sodium polyacrylic acid, carbonate, and silicate, in the clay suspension. The apparent viscosity values were used as a measure of dispersant effectiveness. The six dispersants were either highly effective (polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, silicate, phosphate, and 1:1) or ineffective (carbonate). The rheological behavior of the 1:1 dispersant was indifferent to the addition sequence of its components, but could be affected by the suspension preparation method. The specific adsorption tendency of ionic species was determined and indicated that the anions were responsible for dispersion.