Chapter 15. Organic and Inorganic Dispersion of Alumina

  1. William M. Carty
  1. Brian R. Sundlof and
  2. William M. Carty

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294543.ch15

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 2

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 2

How to Cite

Sundlof, B. R. and Carty, W. M. (1999) Organic and Inorganic Dispersion of Alumina, in Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 2 (ed W. M. Carty), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294543.ch15

Author Information

  1. New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1999

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375624

Online ISBN: 9780470294543

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Keywords:

  • electrostatic;
  • stabilization;
  • homogeneity;
  • stabilization;
  • mechanisms

Summary

The viscosity of aqueous suspensions of two α-alumina (Al2O3) powders, dispersed electrosteric (via polyelectrolyte additions) and electrostatic (via pH adjustment) stabilization, were investigated. The polyelectrolytes examined included the sodium (Na) and ammonium (NH4) salts of polymethylacrylic acid (PMAA) and polyacrylic acid (PM), and the inorganic polyelectrolytes Na-silicate and Na-hexa-metaphosphate. Acids (HO and H2SO4) and bases (NaOH and NH4OH) were used to adjust suspension behavior via pH. Viscosity measurements produced dual minima in several cases of polymeric stabilization for the alumina containing MgO and higher levels of sodium. Washing the powder resulted in the elimination of one viscosity minimum. The results obtained for alumina suspensions were compared to those observed for kaolinite suspensions.