Chapter 5. Effect of Plasticizer on Compaction Behavior and Springback Defects

  1. William M. Carty
  1. Chase R. Perry and
  2. William M. Carty

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294543.ch5

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 2

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 2

How to Cite

Perry, C. R. and Carty, W. M. (1999) Effect of Plasticizer on Compaction Behavior and Springback Defects, in Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 2 (ed W. M. Carty), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294543.ch5

Author Information

  1. New York State Center for Advanced Ceramic Technology. Whiteware Research Center; New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1999

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375624

Online ISBN: 9780470294543

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Keywords:

  • plasticizer;
  • interactions;
  • characterize;
  • compaction;
  • extrapolating

Summary

The pressing behavior of spray-dried alumina was studied as a function of the amount and type of plasticizer added. Granulate was prepared with a constant PVA binder content and three different levels of glycerin, PEG-400, or PEG-8000 as plasticizers. Compaction diagrams showed glycerin to be the most effective plasticizer, reducing the pressure needed to achieve granule breakdown and increasing the final density of the compacts. Additional pellets were pressed in an attempt to generate springback defects and to correlate the pressure at which defects appeared with the transition from Stage II to Stage III. However, defects were not generated within the limits of the pressing equipment