Chapter 11. Oxidative Degradation Behavior of Polycarbo-Silane-Derived Silicon Carbide Fibers

  1. Ersan Ustundag and
  2. Gary Fischman
  1. A. Urano,
  2. A. Saeki,
  3. M. Takeda and
  4. A. Yokoyama

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294567.ch11

23rd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures : A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 3

23rd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures : A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 3

How to Cite

Urano, A., Saeki, A., Takeda, M. and Yokoyama, A. (1999) Oxidative Degradation Behavior of Polycarbo-Silane-Derived Silicon Carbide Fibers, in 23rd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures : A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 3 (eds E. Ustundag and G. Fischman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294567.ch11

Author Information

  1. Research Laboratory, Nippon Carbon Co., Ltd., 1–1-1 Shin-urashima-cho, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama 221–0031, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1999

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375631

Online ISBN: 9780470294567

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • sic;
  • polycarbosilane;
  • tensile;
  • nicalon;
  • oxidation

Summary

Polycarbosilane-derived SiC fibers, Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon, and Hi-Nicalon Type S were exposed for 1 to 100 hours at 1273∼1773 K in air. Oxide layer growth and tensile strength change of these fibers were examined after the oxidation test. As a result, three types of SiC fibers decreased their strength as oxide layer thickness increased. In this study, Hi-Nicalon Type S showed better strength retention than other polycarbosilane-derived SiC fibers after 1673 K or higher temperature exposure for 10 hours in air. This result was explained by the poreless silicon oxide structure of Hi-Nicalon Type S. On the contrary for Nicalon fiber, many pores existed at the fiber-oxide layer interface and tensile fracture originated at the interface.