Chapter 30. Mechanical Behavior of a Hi-Nicalon™/SiC Composite Having a Polycarbosilane Derived Matrix

  1. Ersan Ustundag and
  2. Gary Fischman
  1. Frances I. Hurwitz1,
  2. Anthony M. Calomino1 and
  3. Terry R. Mccue2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294567.ch30

23rd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures : A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 3

23rd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures : A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 3

How to Cite

Hurwitz, F. I., Calomino, A. M. and Mccue, T. R. (1999) Mechanical Behavior of a Hi-Nicalon™/SiC Composite Having a Polycarbosilane Derived Matrix, in 23rd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures : A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 3 (eds E. Ustundag and G. Fischman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294567.ch30

Author Information

  1. 1

    NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135

  2. 2

    Dynacs Engineering Co., Inc., Brookpark, OH 44142

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1999

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375631

Online ISBN: 9780470294567

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Keywords:

  • pyrolysis;
  • potential;
  • characterization;
  • longitudinal;
  • matrix

Summary

Polymer infiltration of a rigidized preform, followed by pyrolysis to convert the polymer to a ceramic, potentially offers a lower cost alternative to CVD. It also offers more moderate temperature requirements than melt infiltration approaches, which should minimize potential fiber damage during processing. However, polymer infiltration and pyrolysis results in a more microcracked matrix. Preliminary mechanical property characterization, including elevated temperature (1204°C) tensile, 500 h stress rupture behavior and low cycle fatigue, was conducted on Hi-Nicalon™ /Si-C-(O) composites having a dual layer BN/SiC interface and a matrix derived by impregnation and pyrolysis of allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS). Microstructural evaluation of failure surfaces and of polished transverse and longitudinal cross sections of the failed specimens was used to identify predominant failure mechanisms. In stress rupture testing at 1093°C, the failure was interface dominated, while at 1204°C in both stress rupture and two hour hold/fatigue tests failure was matrix dominated, resulting in specimen delamination.