Chapter 31. Comparison of the Tensile, Creep, and Rupture Strength Properties of Stoichiometric SiC Fibers

  1. Ersan Ustundag and
  2. Gary Fischman
  1. Hee Mann Yun and
  2. James A. Dicarlo

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294567.ch31

23rd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures : A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 3

23rd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures : A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 3

How to Cite

Yun, H. M. and Dicarlo, J. A. (1999) Comparison of the Tensile, Creep, and Rupture Strength Properties of Stoichiometric SiC Fibers, in 23rd Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures : A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 20, Issue 3 (eds E. Ustundag and G. Fischman), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294567.ch31

Author Information

  1. NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1999

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375631

Online ISBN: 9780470294567

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • stoichiometric;
  • sylramic;
  • tensile;
  • polymer;
  • pyrolysis

Summary

Tensile strength, creep strength, and rupture strength properties were measured for the following types of polymer-derived stoichiometric SiC fibers: Hi-Nicalon Type S from Nippon Carbon, Tyranno SA from Ube, and Sylramic from Dow Corning. Also included in this study were an earlier version of the SA fiber plus two recent developmental versions of the Sylramic fiber. The tensile strength measurements were made at room temperature on as-received fibers and on fibers after high-temperature inert exposure. The creep-rupture property data were obtained at 1400°C in air as well as argon. Some fiber types showed strong effects of environment on their strength properties. These results are compared and discussed in terms of underlying mechanisms and implications for ceramic composites.