Chapter 18. Effect of Diopside and Wollastonite on the Melting of Soda-Lime-Silicate Glasses

  1. John Kieffer
  1. Christopher C. Tournour and
  2. James E. Shelby

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294598.ch18

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 60th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 60th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 1

How to Cite

Tournour, C. C. and Shelby, J. E. (2000) Effect of Diopside and Wollastonite on the Melting of Soda-Lime-Silicate Glasses, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 60th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 1 (ed J. Kieffer), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294598.ch18

Author Information

  1. New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred University, Alfred, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375662

Online ISBN: 9780470294598

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Keywords:

  • wollastonite;
  • soda-lime-silicate glasses;
  • commercial glasses;
  • magnesium oxides;
  • limestone

Summary

Diopside (SYNSIL-DTM) and wollastonite were used as sources of CaO, MgO, and SiO2 in the formation of soda-lime-silicate glasses. Use of these minerals as sources of CaO and MgO reduces the carbonate content of the batch and thus reduces the amount of CO2 that must be removed during fining. In addition, the use of silicate minerals as the source of a portion of the silica reduces the amount of sand used in the batch and speeds the batch dissolution process. Batch-free and fining time studies at 1350, 1400, and 1450°C indicate that use of diopside reduces the time to form a fined glass by up to 30%. Similar studies of the use of wollastonite did not result in any significant improvement in melting behavior. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that the use of diopside should prove advantageous in the production of commercial soda-lime-silicate glasses.