Chapter 5. Validation of Advanced Models for Glass Melting Furnaces

  1. John Kieffer
  1. J. Wang,
  2. B. S. Brewster,
  3. M. Q. Mcquay and
  4. B. W. Webb

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294598.ch5

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 60th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 60th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 1

How to Cite

Wang, J., Brewster, B. S., Mcquay, M. Q. and Webb, B. W. (2000) Validation of Advanced Models for Glass Melting Furnaces, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 60th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 1 (ed J. Kieffer), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294598.ch5

Author Information

  1. Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375662

Online ISBN: 9780470294598

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Keywords:

  • prediction;
  • phenomena;
  • industrial glass;
  • air-fire1 float glass;
  • coupled model

Summary

An advanced numerical model is presented for the prediction of the primary thermal phenomena in industrial glass furnaces, coupling the combustion space, the batch, and the glass tank. A newly developed batch islands model treats the batch as a continuous blanket that floats on the molten glass surface and allows for the formation of islands as it melts. The coupled model simulates the entire furnace in an integrated fashion. The heat fluxes and temperatures at the interfaces between the combustion space, the batch, and the glass tank are cakulated in an iterative procedure, greatly improving the accuracy of the simulation. A 455 metric ton/day air-fuel float glass furnace was simulated, and the numerical results compared well with measurements obtained from an operating industrial furnace. The coupled model is a powerful research and design tool for the optimization of industrial glass melting furnaces. New combustion technologies, including variations in furnace and burner design, oxygen-fuel firing, enhanced radiation, and so on, can be investigated economically with this coupled model.