Chapter 11. Effects of Glaze Frit Composition on Crystallization and Zircon-Vanadium Pigment Dissolution

  1. William M. Carty
  1. David A. Earl1 and
  2. David E. Clark2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294611.ch11

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 2

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 2

How to Cite

Earl, D. A. and Clark, D. E. (2000) Effects of Glaze Frit Composition on Crystallization and Zircon-Vanadium Pigment Dissolution, in Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 2 (ed W. M. Carty), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294611.ch11

Author Information

  1. 1

    School of Ceramic Engineering and Materials Science, Alfred University, Alfred, New York

  2. 2

    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375679

Online ISBN: 9780470294611

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Keywords:

  • glaze frit composition;
  • crystallization;
  • zircon-vanadium;
  • microstructure development;
  • opacity

Summary

The influences of glaze frit oxides on crystallization and zircon-vanadium pigment dissolution during fast-fire processing were studied. In glazes with fritted ZrO2, the quantity, size, and morphology of zircon precipitates were found to depend mainly on the ZnO, SrO, and Al2O3:alkali levels. In frits with high levels of ZrO2 ZnO, and Al2O3:alkali, no zircon pigment dissolution occurred and zircon crystallization from the frit was complete by 1000°C. Glossy glazes were developed with consistent microstructures and color over a range of peak firing temperatures from 1000 to 1000°C. The presence of fritted ZnO stimulated zircon crystallization and produced high-quality opaque coatings. Replacing ZnO with SrO in the same pits completely prevented zircon from precipitating and resulted in transparent glazes These high-quality, stable, transparent coatings deviate from the customary industrial practice of excluding ZrO, from frits for transparent glazes. Although raising the Al2O3: alkali ratio increased the melt viscosity, it resulted in a greater quantity of zircon forming more spherical precipitates, and superior opacification. In Fits without ZrO, increasing the ratio had the reverse effect of reducing crystallization and also lowered pigment dissolution. Overall, frits without ZrO, exhibited significant pigment dissolution and crystallization of Cabased silicates during firing, which increased from 1000 to 1100°C and resulted in unstable color and gloss.