Chapter 12. Correlating Suspension Rheology with Suspension Chemistry in a Clay-Based System

  1. William M. Carty
  1. William M. Carty and
  2. Katherine Rossington

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294611.ch12

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 2

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 2

How to Cite

Carty, W. M. and Rossington, K. (2000) Correlating Suspension Rheology with Suspension Chemistry in a Clay-Based System, in Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 2 (ed W. M. Carty), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294611.ch12

Author Information

  1. NYS CACT–Whiteware Research Center, School of Ceramic Engineering and Materials Science. New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375679

Online ISBN: 9780470294611

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Keywords:

  • correlating suspension rheology;
  • clay-based system;
  • suspension chemistry;
  • cal coagulation concentration (CCC);
  • incubation period

Summary

The rheology of an industrial whiteware suspension was altered by the addition of CaCl2 solutions. The apparent viscosity, measured under steady-state conditions in a strain-controlled rheometer, followed trends similar to those observed in previous work. To analyze the chemistry ofeach suspension, the baroid test was used and the filtrate was analyzed for dissolved ions. Although the trends exhibited similar behavior, it was clear that at low CaCl2 addition levels, raw material dissolution contributes significantly to the ionic strength, reinforcing the need for accurate and timely cation measurement within the manufacturing environment.