Chapter 32. Kinetics of Silicon Carbide Deposition in Forced Flow Chemical Vapor Infiltration

  1. Todd Jessen and
  2. Ersan Ustundag
  1. Thomas L. Starr1 and
  2. Daniel Y. Chiang2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch32

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

How to Cite

Starr, T. L. and Chiang, D. Y. (2000) Kinetics of Silicon Carbide Deposition in Forced Flow Chemical Vapor Infiltration, in 24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3 (eds T. Jessen and E. Ustundag), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch32

Author Information

  1. 1

    Chemical Engineering University of Louisville Louisville, KY 40292

  2. 2

    Materials Science and Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375686

Online ISBN: 9780470294628

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Keywords:

  • allyl-substituted hydridopolycarbosilane;
  • silicon carbide (SiC);
  • particulate filters;
  • SIC matrix composites;
  • polymer/particulate slurries

Summary

The forced flow method greatly reduces processing time for chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of ceramic matrix composites. New kinetics measurements for silicon carbide from methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) show the importance of the gas-phase pyro lysis reactions on the deposit composition and rate of formation. A kinetics model, including both gas-phase and surface reactions, predicts flow rate effects and the transition from silicon-rich to stoichiometric silicon carbide near the reactor inlet.