Chapter 35. Infiltration Processing of Transition Metal Silicide-Silicon Carbide Composites

  1. Todd Jessen and
  2. Ersan Ustundag
  1. G. R. Maskaly and
  2. Y.-M. Chiang

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch35

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

How to Cite

Maskaly, G. R. and Chiang, Y.-M. (2000) Infiltration Processing of Transition Metal Silicide-Silicon Carbide Composites, in 24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3 (eds T. Jessen and E. Ustundag), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch35

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375686

Online ISBN: 9780470294628

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Keywords:

  • silicon carbide (Sic) matrix composites;
  • melt infiltration;
  • tensile properties;
  • thermal conductivity;
  • microcracking

Summary

Possible alternative matrix materials for silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced composites have been explored. As SiC-based fibers become increasingly refractory, new matrix materials will be required to replace the melt-infiltrated Si-SiC matrix currently used in many composites. Melts in the compatibility triangles MoSi2-Mo5Si3C-SiC and VSi2-V5Si3C-SiC, as well as an alloy of these two systems, were studied in infiltration experiments. Experiments were conducted on porous SiC samples as well as SiC-fiber reinforced composites. Promising results were obtained in a composite with a Mo-V-Si-C alloy matrix, with low reactivity and fiber pullout being observed after high-temperature melt infiltration.