Chapter 46. Fracture Resistance of a Ceramic Composite at Elevated Temperatures

  1. Todd Jessen and
  2. Ersan Ustundag
  1. E. T. Park,
  2. U. Anandakumar and
  3. R. N. Singh

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch46

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

How to Cite

Park, E. T., Anandakumar, U. and Singh, R. N. (2000) Fracture Resistance of a Ceramic Composite at Elevated Temperatures, in 24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3 (eds T. Jessen and E. Ustundag), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch46

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Cincinnati P.O. Box 210012 Cincinnati, OH 45221-0012

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375686

Online ISBN: 9780470294628

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Keywords:

  • silicon carbide fiber;
  • matrix ceramic composites;
  • nuclear fusion systems;
  • mechanical properties;
  • electron microscopy

Summary

The fracture resistance behavior (R-curve) of unidirectional silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber-reinforced zircon (ZrSiO4) matrix composites is studied over the temperature range of 20°-1400°C. In situ crack length measurements are obtained using a traveling optical telescope in order to measure the R-curve behavior accurately. The results indicated that composites exhibit a rising R-curve behavior at all the temperatures used in this test. Two different crack growth patterns are observed below and above 1250°C. Below 1250°C, a single dominant crack is propagated from the notch tip, while multiple cracks are propagated above 1250°C because of the concurrent plastic deformation of the composite. The initial fracture toughness remained constant with increasing temperature, while the maximum value decreased with increasing temperature. This anomalous behavior is attributed to the multiple crack growth behavior observed above 1250°C, which resulted in a lower value of the fracture toughness at the tip of the dominant crack.