Chapter 5. Advanced Hot Gas Filter Development

  1. Todd Jessen and
  2. Ersan Ustundag
  1. Theodore J. McMahon

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch5

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

How to Cite

McMahon, T. J. (2000) Advanced Hot Gas Filter Development, in 24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3 (eds T. Jessen and E. Ustundag), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch5

Author Information

  1. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, MS C04 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375686

Online ISBN: 9780470294628

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Keywords:

  • thermal shock;
  • hot gas candle filter;
  • high temperatures;
  • internal burst pressures;
  • axial tests

Summary

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently sponsoring a program to develop and test hot gas filtration systems, demonstrating their reliability and commercial readiness. Reliability of individual filter elements is a major factor in determining the overall system reliability, and testing has shown that conventional ceramic filter elements are subject to brittle failure and thermal stress damage. In order to increase filter element reliability, a program was initiated to develop ceramic and metal filter elements resistant to brittle failure and thermal stress damage. Filter elements have been developed using advanced materials including continuous fiber ceramic composites, other novel ceramics, and corrosion resistant metals.

A phased approach was taken to develop damage tolerant filter elements beginning with development of porous filter media in the laboratory, and culminating with testing of prototype filter elements in large scale power systems. Advanced filters have performed well under coal-fired, pilot scale testing, surviving thermal transients that caused failure of monolithic ceramic filters.

This paper will provide a programmatic overview of the development and testing of these advanced hot gas filters. A major goal of DOE'S Fossil Energy Program is to commercialize advanced fossil energy power generation technology. A prerequisite of achieving that goal is to commercialize the subsystems and components that make up power systems. Therefore, the goal of the this program was to bring hot gas filter elements to a state of commercial readiness. At the end of the program, Pall Corporation announced that the iron aluminide filter element is commercially available. In summary, this program based on cooperation between industry and government has commercialized hot gas filter components based on advanced materials technology.