Chapter 7. Refractory Performance in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace for Power Generation

  1. Todd Jessen and
  2. Ersan Ustundag
  1. W. H. Sutton1,
  2. D. J. Seery1,
  3. C. E. Bird1,
  4. G. F. Weber2,
  5. J. P. Hurley2 and
  6. P. L. Kleven2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch7

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

How to Cite

Sutton, W. H., Seery, D. J., Bird, C. E., Weber, G. F., Hurley, J. P. and Kleven, P. L. (2000) Refractory Performance in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace for Power Generation, in 24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3 (eds T. Jessen and E. Ustundag), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch7

Author Information

  1. 1

    United Technologies Research Center East Hartford, CT 06108

  2. 2

    University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center Grand Forks, ND 58203

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375686

Online ISBN: 9780470294628

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Keywords:

  • diamong film-coated blades;
  • blade catridges;
  • development cost;
  • payback period;
  • gillette

Summary

The development of high-efficiency, low-emission, indirect coal-fired power generation systems has been greatly limited by the ability to produce clean, high-temperature air from the products of coal combustion. Recently, a uniquely designed radiant air heater (RAH) demonstrated the capability to produce clean, pressurized air heated to 1093°C (2000°F) in a 3.2 × 106kJ/h (3 MMBTU/h) coal-fired pilot test facility at the Energy and Environmental Research Center at the Univ. of North Dakota (EERC). The key to this achievement was in the development and design of a unique air heater system, which is discussed along with the selection of candidate refractory ceramic materials and their performance in 1005 hours of furnace time in the pilot test facility.