74. Evolution of Thermal Residual Stress in Intermetallic Matrix Composites During Heating

  1. Todd Jessen and
  2. Ersan Ustundag
  1. Hahn Choo1,
  2. Mark A. M. Bourke1,
  3. Mark R. Daymond2 and
  4. Philip G. Nash3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch74

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

How to Cite

Choo, H., Bourke, M. A. M., Daymond, M. R. and Nash, P. G. (2000) Evolution of Thermal Residual Stress in Intermetallic Matrix Composites During Heating, in 24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3 (eds T. Jessen and E. Ustundag), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch74

Author Information

  1. 1

    Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545

  2. 2

    ISIS Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Chilton, Didcot, Oxon. 0X11 OQX England

  3. 3

    Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Eng. Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago, IL 60616

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375686

Online ISBN: 9780470294628

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Keywords:

  • alumina-glass composite;
  • erosion;
  • strength degradation;
  • elastic modulus;
  • ceramic components

Summary

Thermal residual stress (TRS) was measured using neutron diffraction during in situ heating (300-1500K) of NiAl-based hybrid composites, reinforced with both AlN dispersoids and Al2O3 short fibers (NiAl-AlN-Al2O3). A finite element model was developed and validated using the measured data. Using the model, evolution of the TRS in each phase was studied systematically by varying matrix properties (elastic, elastoplastic or viscoplastic); and cooling/heating path and rate. The best description of the experimental data was achieved by using a creeping matrix in the model coupled with the actual thermo-mechanical history applied to the specimen. It was demonstrated that a methodology, which combines (i) in situ high-temperature neutron diffraction measurements and (ii) a finite element model that considers matrix viscoplasticity and path/rate-dependency, provides a reasonable prediction of the TRS in this three-phase composite both at low and high temperatures.