Chapter 83. Structure and Strength of Interfaces in Titanium-Coated Diamond-Glass Composites

  1. Todd Jessen and
  2. Ersan Ustundag
  1. Carey T. Williams1 and
  2. Rounan Li2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch83

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3

How to Cite

Williams, C. T. and Li, R. (2000) Structure and Strength of Interfaces in Titanium-Coated Diamond-Glass Composites, in 24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 3 (eds T. Jessen and E. Ustundag), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294628.ch83

Author Information

  1. 1

    Chrysanthe Demetry Materials Science and Engineering Program Worcester Polytechnic Institute 100 Institute Road Worcester, MA 01609

  2. 2

    St. Gobain I New Bond Street M.S. 420-601 Worcester, MA 01615

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375686

Online ISBN: 9780470294628

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Keywords:

  • high-strain-rate behavior;
  • ceramics;
  • microstructures;
  • quantitative microscopy;
  • microstructural bias

Summary

This research investigated using titanium (Ti) as a coating on diamond paniculate in order to strengthen the interface between diamond and a borosilicate glass matrix. Specific objectives were to determine which interface is weaker, diamond/Ti or Ti/glass, and to determine the presence and extent of carbide and/or oxide interlayers and their effect on interfacial strength. Both physically and chemically deposited titanium (Ti) coatings on diamond particulates were examined, and heat treatments of the coated diamond were also used to produce a variety of interfacial structures. Composites were prepared by hot pressing and were characterized by four point bend tests, fractography, X-ray diffraction, and Auger Electron Spectroscopy. The diamond/Ti interface was found to be weaker than the Ti/glass interface, for both coating processes and for all heat treatments examined. TiC formed at the diamond/Ti interface during the thermal coating process and increased the strength of the composite relative to samples containing uncoated diamond and physically Ti-coated diamond, where there was no carbide at the interface. TiC formed by heat treatment of the physically Ti-coated diamond, however, did not always result in an improvement of interfacial strength since extensive through-thickness cracks formed in the coatings on some diamond particle morphologies.