Chapter 20. Solid Freeform Fabrication of Intermetallics and Their Ceramic Composites by Reactive Rapid Prototyping

  1. Todd Jessen and
  2. Ersan Ustundag
  1. Kiyotaka Matsuura1,
  2. Masayuki Kudoh1,
  3. Soshu Kirihara2 and
  4. Yoshinari Miyamoto2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294635.ch20

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 4

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 4

How to Cite

Matsuura, K., Kudoh, M., Kirihara, S. and Miyamoto, Y. (2000) Solid Freeform Fabrication of Intermetallics and Their Ceramic Composites by Reactive Rapid Prototyping, in 24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 4 (eds T. Jessen and E. Ustundag), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294635.ch20

Author Information

  1. 1

    Division of Materials Science and Engineering Hokkaido University Sapporo, Hokkaido 060–8628, Japan

  2. 2

    Joining and Welding Research Institute Osaka University Ibaraki, Osaka 567–0047, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375693

Online ISBN: 9780470294635

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Keywords:

  • droplet based solid;
  • intermetallic compound;
  • demonstration material;
  • solid freeform fabrication;
  • ceramic composites

Summary

A novel droplet-based solid freeform fabrication technique for the fast manufacture of intermetallics and their ceramic composites has been proposed. This technique is based on feeding of powder metal and dropping of liquid metal. An exothermic SHS reaction between the two metals produces an intermetallic compound. By continuous feeding and dropping of the metals, a three-dimensional structure of the intermetallic compound is configured. One may mix a certain ceramic powder with the metal powder in order to produce an intermetallic-ceramic composite material. The feasibility of this technique has been examined taking an intermetallic compound of NiAl as an demonstration material. When an aluminum droplet is dropped onto a nickel powder bed, the two metals react and produce a small NiAl bead. After covering the NiAl bead with newly fed nickel powder, a next droplet is dropped to produce a new NiAl bead. When the new NiAl bead solidifies on the former one, those two NiAl beads are bonded. Thus, the feasibility of the present solid freeform fabrication technique has been confirmed.