Chapter 4. Plasma Jet Generation Over the Liquid Surface and Its Application to Diamond Synthesis

  1. Todd Jessen and
  2. Ersan Ustundag
  1. Takeyuki Suzuki1 and
  2. Satoshi Wada2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294635.ch4

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 4

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 4

How to Cite

Suzuki, T. and Wada, S. (2000) Plasma Jet Generation Over the Liquid Surface and Its Application to Diamond Synthesis, in 24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 4 (eds T. Jessen and E. Ustundag), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294635.ch4

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2–24-16 Naka-Chyo, Koganei-Shi, Tokyo 184–8588, Japan

  2. 2

    Department of Inorganic Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2–12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152–8552, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375693

Online ISBN: 9780470294635

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Keywords:

  • diamond synthesis;
  • DC plasma;
  • chemical vapor deposition(CVD);
  • potassium acetate;
  • semiconductor

Summary

A new approach was proposed for the low-pressure diamond synthesis using liquids as starting materials for carbon sources. The principle is to generate a DC plasma between the metal nozzle and the liquid surface. Plasma thus generated was led onto the insulator and the semiconductor for deposition. After deposition for 1 h, well-faceted diamond was formed. The growth rate of the diamond film was 10 μ m/h.