Chapter 71. Microwave Sntering at High Temperature

  1. Todd Jessen and
  2. Ersan Ustundag
  1. H. E. Huey1,
  2. Q. S. Wang1,
  3. M. S. Morrow2 and
  4. D. E. Schechter2

Published Online: 28 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294635.ch71

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 4

24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 4

How to Cite

Huey, H. E., Wang, Q. S., Morrow, M. S. and Schechter, D. E. (2000) Microwave Sntering at High Temperature, in 24th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 21, Issue 4 (eds T. Jessen and E. Ustundag), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294635.ch71

Author Information

  1. 1

    Micramics, Inc. 2368-B Walsh Ave. Santa Clara, CA 95051

  2. 2

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Y-12 Development Division Oak Ridge, TN 37831–8096

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375693

Online ISBN: 9780470294635

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Keywords:

  • energy consuming;
  • microwave furnaces;
  • thermal conductivity;
  • microwave processing;
  • simplified steady state model

Summary

Sintering of ceramics at high temperature (>1700°C) in conventional furnaces is time and energy consuming. Often hot isostatic pressing is preferred. Several materials B4C, AIN, SiC, Al2O3 have been microwave sintered and scaling to large size is demonstrated. A simplified steady state model is outlined. Experiments were conducted with both 2.45 and 24 GHz microwave furnaces.