Chapter 13. Aspects of the Glass Melt Properties Database Investigations at Alfred University

  1. Charles H. Drummond III
  1. Thomas P. Seward

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294659.ch13

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1

How to Cite

Seward, T. P. (2001) Aspects of the Glass Melt Properties Database Investigations at Alfred University, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1 (ed C. H. Drummond), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294659.ch13

Author Information

  1. Center for Glass Research, School of Ceramic Engineering and Materials Science, New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375716

Online ISBN: 9780470294659

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Keywords:

  • borosilicote;
  • combustion;
  • equilibrium;
  • mathematical;
  • heatcapacity

Summary

Under the guidance of the NSF Industry University Center for Glass Research (CGR), researchers at Alfred University and at the Thermex Company in St. Petersburg, Russia, are developing a glass melt properties database for the benefit of glass manufacturers who model glass melting and forming processes. This paper describes the composition ranges being studied for six types of glass (container glass, float glass, fiberglass (E and wool types), low-expansion borosilicate glass, and TV panel glass), the properties being measured, and the procedure to be used for database evaluation at Alfred and at CGR member companies. Among the melt properties discussed are gas solubility, density, thermal expansion, surface tension, viscosity (Newtonian and non-Newtonian), heat capacity, and radiative thermal conductivity. The techniques used for each type of measurement are described in general terms and some newly developed experimental methods are discussed. No quantitative data will be fully disclosed, but examples of some experimental results will be given.