Chapter 14. SOx Emissions from Silicate Glass Batches

  1. Charles H. Drummond III
  1. L. E. Jones,
  2. T. W. Samadhi and
  3. A. G. Clare

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294659.ch14

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1

How to Cite

Jones, L. E., Samadhi, T. W. and Clare, A. G. (2001) SOx Emissions from Silicate Glass Batches, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1 (ed C. H. Drummond), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294659.ch14

Author Information

  1. Alfred University School of Ceramic Engineering and Materials Science, Alfred, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375716

Online ISBN: 9780470294659

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Keywords:

  • decomposition;
  • volatilization;
  • refractories;
  • mathematical;
  • equilibrium

Summary

Na2SO4, which is added as a fining agent in silicate glass batches, has been identified as a source of SOx. Carbon may be present in cullet or added during fining. Interaction between Na2SO4 and carbon in silicate glass batches influences the decomposition behavior of Na2SO4. Na2SO4 and Na2SO4+C decomposition experiments are undertaken in inert and O2-rich atmospheres. Decomposition of Na2SO4 alone is observed to initiate at ∼ 1100°C. Carbon promotes decomposition at lower temperatures, indicated by the presence of lower-temperature decomposition regions at ∼500°C in O2 and ∼850° in N2. SOx is released at temperatures as low as 500°C in O2. SO(g) and SO2 (g) are the decomposition products in O2. In N2, SO2 (g) is the sole decomposition product. For Na2SO4+C in O2, the concentration of O(g) at 500°C is 230 ppmV, with an SO/SO2 peak ratio of 1.23. The decomposition mechanism of Na2SO4 can be described by a surface reaction in which SOx if formed via rearrangements of active S–O complexes on the Na2SO4 melt surface. Isothermal decomposition of Na2SO4+C in N2 at 1200°C exhibits a rapid mass loss during the heatup period and a region of higher decomposition rate at shorter times. At longer times, the decomposition rate is similar to that of Na2SO4 alone.