Chapter 15. Impact of Glass Furnace Operation on Evaporation from Glass Melts

  1. Charles H. Drummond III
  1. Ruud G. C. Beerkens and
  2. Johannes A. C. Van Limpt

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294659.ch15

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1

How to Cite

Beerkens, R. G. C. and Van Limpt, J. A. C. (2001) Impact of Glass Furnace Operation on Evaporation from Glass Melts, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1 (ed C. H. Drummond), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294659.ch15

Author Information

  1. TNO Institute of Applied Physics, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375716

Online ISBN: 9780470294659

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Keywords:

  • evaporation;
  • volatile;
  • magnesium;
  • potassium;
  • chlorides

Summary

The effect of relevant operating conditions such as furnace atmosphere, glass melt surface temperature, and gas velocity on the evaporation of glass components has been determined on laboratory and industrial scale. From these tests and mass transfer models, quantitative relations are determined that fairly accurately predict the evaporation rates and dust emissions, dependent on operating conditions. The results and relationships found can be used to minimize evaporation and emissions in industrial furnaces by primary measures. Results of evaporation tests for soda-lime-silica, 7V panel, and borosilicate glass melts will be shown.