Chapter 19. The Glass Furnace Combustion and Melting User Research Facility

  1. Charles H. Drummond III
  1. Peter M. Walsh1,
  2. Robert J. Gallagher1 and
  3. Vincent I. Henry2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294659.ch19

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1

How to Cite

Walsh, P. M., Gallagher, R. J. and Henry, V. I. (2008) The Glass Furnace Combustion and Melting User Research Facility, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 61st Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 1 (ed C. H. Drummond), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294659.ch19

Author Information

  1. 1

    Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

  2. 2

    Henry Technology Solutions, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375716

Online ISBN: 9780470294659

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Keywords:

  • combustion;
  • configurations;
  • spectroscopy;
  • equations;
  • temperature

Summary

The Glass Technology Roadmap, drawn by representatives of the glass industry in collaboration with the Glass Team in the U. S. DOE Office of Industrial Technologies, identified the need for glass manufacturers to have access to an advanced laboratory for glass furnace combustion and melting research. Visteon Glass Systems was chosen to lead the establishment of a laboratory-scale tank furnace in the Combustion Research Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. The combustion and melting research laboratory, now in the design stage, will be a user facility, open to engineers, scientists, and technicians from industry, universities, research institutes, and national laboratories for joint work with Sandia staff on the solution of practical problems associated with glass melting. This paper summarizes the status of the project, including the requirements for the facility identified as important by members of the glass industry and the problems recommended as the focus of the research.

The sizes of tanks under consideration have melting areas that range from 10 to 70 ft2 and pull rates between 1 and 7 tpd. The furnace will be fired by natural gas, using either air or oxygen for combustion, and equipped with electric boost and bubblers. Sufficient capacity for both fuel and electric power will permit the furnace to be run over the entire range of heat input configurations from all-fuel to all-electric. The glasses to be produced will be primarily soda-lime-silica types and, possibly, alkali borosilicate compositions. The glass will be formed into plates or tubes, for ease of sampling and inspection.