Chapter 1. Kaolin and Ball Clay Processing for Ceramic Utilization

  1. William M. Carty
  1. Haydn H. Murray

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294673.ch1

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 2

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 2

How to Cite

Murray, H. H. (2008) Kaolin and Ball Clay Processing for Ceramic Utilization, in Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 2 (ed W. M. Carty), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294673.ch1

Author Information

  1. Department of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375723

Online ISBN: 9780470294673

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Keywords:

  • impurities;
  • ball clay;
  • ceramic utilization;
  • blending;
  • kaolin

Summary

The purpose of processing is to remove and/or reduce impurities and to enhance physical properties. In order to determine the best method to remove impurities, the impurities must be identified and their particle size determined. Quartz, mica, iron minerals, titanium minerals, and carbonaceous compounds are the major impurities. Physical properties that can be altered and enhanced are particle size, shape, and distribution; surface area; color; rheology; plasticity; modulus of rupture; shrinkage; fired color; casting rate; and suspension. Some of the processes that are used to reduce impurity levels and enhance physical properties are screening, classification by centrifuge, high-intensity magnetic separation, blending, flotation, selective flocculation, grinding (wet and dry), calcination, and dispersion. The amount and type of processing are limited by cost.