Chapter 8. The Surface Thermodynamic Properties of Clay Minerals

  1. William M. Carty
  1. R. F. Giese Jr.

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294673.ch8

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 2

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 2

How to Cite

Giese, R. F. (2001) The Surface Thermodynamic Properties of Clay Minerals, in Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 2 (ed W. M. Carty), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294673.ch8

Author Information

  1. Department of Geology, SUNY/Buffalo, Buffalo, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375723

Online ISBN: 9780470294673

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Keywords:

  • clay minerals;
  • surface thermodynamic properties;
  • colloidal systems;
  • interfacial interactions;
  • dipole-dipole interactions

Summary

Interfacial phenomena are particularly important in colloidal systems, especially in the presence of water. Interfacial interactions are of two types, the first being apolar interactions. These result from dipole-dipole interactions (Keesom forces), permanent dipole-induced dipole interactions (Debye forces), and fluctuating dipole-induced dipole interactions (London forces). The macroscopic theory is due to Lifshitz so these are known as Lifshitz-van der Waals forces. The polar interactions result from Lewis acid-base phenomena, the largest contributor being hydrogen bonding. Uniformly, the Lewis acid parameter is small and near zero while the Lewis base parameter varies from a few mJ/m2 to as much as 50 mJ/m2. Thus, the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of a clay mineral is determined by the electron donicity of the surface. The boundary between these is at approximately 28 mJ/m2.