Chapter 11. Cermet Tool and Die Materials from Metal Coated Powders

  1. Mrityunjay Singh and
  2. Todd Jessen
  1. Andrew J. Sherman1,
  2. DR. Greg Smith1,
  3. MR. Dean Baker1 and
  4. MR. Richard Toth2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294680.ch11

25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3

25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3

How to Cite

Sherman, A. J., Smith, G., Dean Baker, MR. and Richard Toth, MR. (2001) Cermet Tool and Die Materials from Metal Coated Powders, in 25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3 (eds M. Singh and T. Jessen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294680.ch11

Author Information

  1. 1

    Powdermet, Inc. 9960 Glenoaks Blvd., Unit A Sun Valley, CA 91352

  2. 2

    En Dur Aloy Corp. 21 Breckenridge Lane Savannah, GA 31411

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375730

Online ISBN: 9780470294680

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Keywords:

  • carbide;
  • monolithic;
  • stoichiometric;
  • microstructure;
  • titanium

Summary

Ceramics such as alumina, diamond, titanium nitride, and titanium carbide have superior hardness and wear resistance compared to tool steel and cemented carbide tool and die materials. However, poor toughness and thermal shock resistance limit the use of ceramics in metal cutting and forming applications. A new approach uses coated powder manufacturing methods to create high strength and toughness composites from alumina, titanium nitride, diamond, and titanium carbide, embedded in a nano-grain tungsten carbide\cobalt matrix. The core-rim structure of these engineered composites results in superior mechanical and wear properties in both sintered and thermally sprayed materials. Composite tools manufactured from these engineered particles have mechanical properties approaching those of cemented carbides, with wear resistance approaching that of ceramics. The resulting composite represents a revolutionary improvement in tool and die capabilities.