Chapter 4. Will Pigs Fly Before Ceramics Do?

  1. Mrityunjay Singh and
  2. Todd Jessen
  1. Lisa C. Veitch and
  2. William S. Hong

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294680.ch4

25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3

25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3

How to Cite

Veitch, L. C. and Hong, W. S. (2001) Will Pigs Fly Before Ceramics Do?, in 25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3 (eds M. Singh and T. Jessen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294680.ch4

Author Information

  1. Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) 1801 N. Beauregard St. Alexandria, VA 22311

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375730

Online ISBN: 9780470294680

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Keywords:

  • ceramic;
  • methodology;
  • aeropropulsion;
  • monolithic;
  • piezoelectric

Summary

The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of using current technology ceramic rotating components in an advanced turbofan engine core, to determine the associated risks of doing so, and to identify and recommend materials development activities which would best address those risks. Both monolithic and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) materials were considered and the study also took into consideration the use of ceramics in adjoining static components. The scope of this study included fact-finding discussions with knowledgeable personnel from the military services, government agencies, U.S. aeropropulsion and power turbine companies, advanced (ceramic) materials companies, and universities on advanced turbine engine cycle concepts, manufacturing processes and the current general state of acceptance of ceramics in turbine engines. An IDA-adapted technology maturation assessment methodology was applied to the ceramics data where appropriate. This methodology provides guidance in supporting efforts that will have the greatest impact in solving problems related to acceptance and qualification of advanced ceramics in turbine engines for aircraft. The results of the assessment are presented in a summary form.