Chapter 5. Structural Ceramics with Complex Shape - Forming Methods

  1. Mrityunjay Singh and
  2. Todd Jessen
  1. Gabriela Halina Wroblewska

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294680.ch5

25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3

25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3

How to Cite

Wroblewska, G. H. (2001) Structural Ceramics with Complex Shape - Forming Methods, in 25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3 (eds M. Singh and T. Jessen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294680.ch5

Author Information

  1. BCE Special Ceramics GmbH, 68 229 Mannheim, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375730

Online ISBN: 9780470294680

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • monolithic;
  • electrophoretic;
  • automobile;
  • geometry;
  • stereolitography

Summary

Most ceramic components produced in an industrial scale have relatively simple shape, but there is also a market for ceramics with complex shapes, high precision and very low surface roughness. This is the reason for the development of “near-net-shape” forming methods which minimize finishing. Many new forming methods, such as gel casting, electrophoretic casting, laser sintering and stereolitography are in development. Only injection moulding and machining of green blanks have significance in industry. In this paper, the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of these two methods are described.