Chapter 6. Rbao: From Materials Development to Commercial Components

  1. Mrityunjay Singh and
  2. Todd Jessen
  1. Rolf Janssen1,
  2. Nils Claussen1,
  3. Sven Scheppokat3 and
  4. Mark Roeger3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294680.ch6

25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3

25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3

How to Cite

Janssen, R., Claussen, N., Scheppokat, S. and Roeger, M. (2001) Rbao: From Materials Development to Commercial Components, in 25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3 (eds M. Singh and T. Jessen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294680.ch6

Author Information

  1. 1

    Technical University Hamburg-Harburg Advanced Ceramics Group 21071 Hamburg Germany

  2. 3

    MEH Materials Engineering Hamburg GmbH Nartenstr. 4a 21073 Hamburg Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375730

Online ISBN: 9780470294680

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Keywords:

  • aluminum;
  • parameters;
  • ethanol;
  • temperature;
  • prototypes

Summary

The RBAO (Reaction Bonding of Aluminum Oxide) process that has been developed at the Technical University Hamburg-Harburg is particularly suitable for the low-cost manufacturing of high-strength ceramic components. RBAO offers excellent green machinability together with a reduced sintering shrinkage. RBAO was invented at the end of the 80s and has now made the step from the lab to commercialization of components in a company. This was made possible by intensive research that has provided data and shown the technological “window” for feasible process parameters. Major steps towards commercial use included the use of cheaper raw materials, upscaling of the milling together with establishing methods for powder characterization in order to achieve a reproducible material, and optimization of green machining. Apart from the original RBAO, variants of the material such as Alumina Aluminide Alloys (3A) and Reaction Bonded Mullite (RBM) have been developed.