Chapter 72. Stressed Oxidation and Modeling of C\Sic in Oxidizing Environments

  1. Mrityunjay Singh and
  2. Todd Jessen
  1. Michael C. Halbig

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294680.ch72

25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3

25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3

How to Cite

Halbig, M. C. (2001) Stressed Oxidation and Modeling of C\Sic in Oxidizing Environments, in 25th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 22, Issue 3 (eds M. Singh and T. Jessen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294680.ch72

Author Information

  1. Army Research Labs - Vehicle Technology Directorate NASA Glenn Research Center 21000 Brookpark Rd. MS 106–1 Cleveland, OH, 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375730

Online ISBN: 9780470294680

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • temperature;
  • aerospace;
  • materials;
  • degradation;
  • methodology

Summary

Carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites (C\SiC) are a promising material for use in many high temperature structural applications. The proposed applications are primarily in aerospace, i.e., nozzles, thrusters, turbopumps, brakes, and heat shields. However, the susceptibility of carbon fiber to oxidation has hindered its application in long term and reusable applications. This is due to reductions in composite strength and life during exposure in oxidizing environments. In order to better understand environmental effects on C\SiC materials, stressed oxidation (creep rupture) tests were conducted in an air environment at sustained loads at elevated temperatures. A temperature within each of the two primary oxidation kinetics regimes (diffusion controlled and reaction controlled) was chosen. Microstructural analysis of tested samples, which show environmental degradation of carbon fibers, will be discussed. A finite difference model will be used to simulate the oxidation of carbon fiber in a silicon carbide matrix. The model is to be used for predicting composite life and\or strength reduction of C\SiC in elevated temperature oxidizing environments under sustained tensile load conditions.