Chapter 8. Wear Mechanism in Porcelain Tile Polishing

  1. William M. Carty
  1. Enrique Sanchez,
  2. Jose Orts,
  3. Javier Garcia,
  4. Jesus Ibaner and
  5. Vincente Cantavella

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294734.ch8

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 2

Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 2

How to Cite

Sanchez, E., Orts, J., Garcia, J., Ibaner, J. and Cantavella, V. (2002) Wear Mechanism in Porcelain Tile Polishing, in Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 2 (ed W. M. Carty), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294734.ch8

Author Information

  1. Instituto de Tecnologia Ceramica, Castellon, Spain

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375778

Online ISBN: 9780470294734

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Keywords:

  • wear mechanism;
  • porcelain tile polishing;
  • surface roughness;
  • gloss;
  • porcelain tile abrasion

Summary

Porcelain tile is polished to reduce surface roughness and heighten gloss, thus enhancing the quality. Though polished porcelain tile has a notably higher added value than unpolished porcelain tile, polishing costs are high and productivity is low. A process stage is therefore involved that clearly needs optimizing. The relationship between porcelain tile wear rate, abrasive (CSi) pressure, and particle size was determined in a laboratory polishing machine. This relationship, together with SEM observation of the test specimen surface and specimen chips, indicates that the brittle fracture mechanism is the predominant mechanism in porcelain tile abrasion. Porcelain tile specimens were designed on a laboratory scale with different mechanical properties. The wear rate of these specimens was shown to depend not only on hardness but also on toughness, which confirms the prevailing role of the above mechanism. Finally, samples from an industrial polishing train were studied to determine how porcelain tile topography and microstructure evolve in the polishing train. CSi abrasive grains were found to produce scmtches consisting of small cracks, which would subsequently give rise to chipping. Decreasing abrasive particle size as the tile advances in the polishing train reduces crack and hence scratch size. This mechanism progressively reduces surface roughness and raises gloss. The maximum attainable gloss depends almost wholly on tile porosity and end microstructural defects.