Chapter 22. Foreign Object Damage of Two Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitrides at Ambient Temperature

  1. Hua-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. Sung R. Choi,
  2. J. Michael Pereira,
  3. Lesley A. Janosik and
  4. Ramakrishna T. Bhatt

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294741.ch22

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3

How to Cite

Choi, S. R., Michael Pereira, J., Janosik, L. A. and Bhatt, R. T. (2002) Foreign Object Damage of Two Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitrides at Ambient Temperature, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294741.ch22

Author Information

  1. NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375785

Online ISBN: 9780470294741

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Keywords:

  • silicon nitrides;
  • indentation;
  • fractography;
  • diameter;
  • morphologies

Summary

Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of two commercially available gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides (AS800 and SN282) was determined at ambient temperature through extensive strength testing of flexure test specimens impacted by steel-ball projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm in a velocity range from 220 to 440 m/s. AS800 silicon nitride exhibited a greater FOD resistance over SN282, primarily due to its greater value of fracture toughness (KIC). This key factor (KIC) affecting FOD resistance was further evidenced by the indentation strength response of both materials as well as by a quasi-static phenomenological impact model. The damage generated by projectile impact seemed to be in the forms of well- or ill-developed cone cracks and of lateral cracks.