Chapter 25. On the 3-D Visualization of Impact Damage in Armor Ceramics

  1. Hua-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. J.M. Wells,
  2. W.H. Green and
  3. N.L. Rupert

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294741.ch25

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3

How to Cite

Wells, J.M., Green, W.H. and Rupert, N.L. (2002) On the 3-D Visualization of Impact Damage in Armor Ceramics, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294741.ch25

Author Information

  1. Army Research Laboratory Weapons Materials Research Directorate APG, MD 21005–5069

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375785

Online ISBN: 9780470294741

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Keywords:

  • ceramics;
  • tomography;
  • 3-D visualization;
  • velocity;
  • inclusions

Summary

Impact damage in brittle armor ceramics consists of multiple, distributed, and frequently interconnected, cracks of varying sizes ranging from micro- to meso-to macro-scale. To better characterize and understand the meso- to macro-scale relationship of damage behavior and failure of opaque armor ceramic materials, the authors have applied the nondestructive method of X-ray Computed Tomography, XCT, to encapsulated ceramics. A brief overview of XCT techniques utilized, and examples of several results produced thereby, are presented to demonstrate the innovative and powerful nature of this method in the 2-D and 3-D visualization of internal physical damage. Ceramic specimens examined include TiC, TiB2, and SiC. The damage examined occurred in situ by either the fabrication, or by high velocity ballistic impact, of these ceramics in encapsulated assemblies.