Chapter 54. Frequency Effects Upon the High-Cycle Fatigue of a CVIC/SiC Composite at Room Temperature

  1. Hua-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. James M. Staehler1,
  2. Shankar Mall2 and
  3. Larry P. Zawada2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294741.ch54

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3

How to Cite

Staehler, J. M., Mall, S. and Zawada, L. P. (2002) Frequency Effects Upon the High-Cycle Fatigue of a CVIC/SiC Composite at Room Temperature, in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294741.ch54

Author Information

  1. 1

    Systran Federal Corp. 4027 Colonel Glenn Highway Suite 210 Dayton, OH 45431–1672

  2. 2

    Materials & Manufacturing Directorate Metals, Ceramics & NDE Division AFRL/MLLN Building 655 Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433–7817

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375785

Online ISBN: 9780470294741

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Keywords:

  • C/SiC composite;
  • characteristic;
  • fiber-matrix debonding;
  • chemical vapor infiltrated;
  • cyanoacrylate adhesive

Summary

The results from a high-cycle fatigue study on a chemical vapor infiltrated C/SiC composite are presented. Loading frequencies of 4, 40, and 375 Hz were used with a cycle limit as high as 108. A load ratio of 0.05 was used in all cases. The cycles to failure for the composite are presented along with a discussion of the importance of loading frequency. Consistent with earlier work in the literature on older versions of this composite, there does appear to be a dependence upon frequency. However, the characteristic S-N curves have shifted relative to the earlier work. Fracture surfaces have shown fiber damage consistent with fretting fatigue but so far nothing that can be tied specifically to a particular frequency or frequency range. The following paper presents the results of this study and compares them with those of previous authors.