Chapter 59. Effects of 3D-Fiber Architecture on Tensile Stress-Strain Behavior of SiC/SiC Composites.

  1. Hua-Tay Lin and
  2. Mrityunjay Singh
  1. H.M. Yun,
  2. J.Z. Gyekenyesi and
  3. J.A. Dicarlo

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294741.ch59

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3

26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3

How to Cite

Yun, H.M., Gyekenyesi, J.Z. and Dicarlo, J.A. (2008) Effects of 3D-Fiber Architecture on Tensile Stress-Strain Behavior of SiC/SiC Composites., in 26th Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 23, Issue 3 (eds H.-T. Lin and M. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294741.ch59

Author Information

  1. NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375785

Online ISBN: 9780470294741

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Keywords:

  • 3D orthogonal;
  • diameter;
  • polymer;
  • microstructures;
  • 2D fabrics

Summary

The structural performance of ceramic matrix composites for both low and high-temperature applications depends strongly on key properties contained in their tensile stress-strain behavior after fabrication. These include elastic modulus, matrix cracking stress, and ultimate strength. To determine the effects of fiber architecture on these properties, melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composite panels were fabricated using 3D orthogonal preforms and 2D fabric lay-ups with various weave patterns. To maximize composite performance, all architectures were constructed with SylramicTM SiC fibers in the in-plane directions. Where possible, the preforms and fabrics were then subjected to a treatment that in-situ formed Sylramic-iBN fibers, a fiber type which typically yields composites with the highest tensile and rupture strength. For the 3D preforms, three types of low-modulus z-fibers were used to allow high in-plane fiber fractions, equivalent to those for the 2D composites. Even though the 3D-orthogonal panels displayed well-aligned × and y fibers with low crimp and lower matrix porosity, the room-temperature elastic modulus, cracking stress, and ultimate strength of these panels were generally lower than the 2D-woven panels. It is believed that the reduced modulus and cracking stress were primarily related to fiber-rich regions, the reduced strength to matrix-rich regions.